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Pulation. There are a number of limitations that should be considered

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Pulation. There are a CGP-57148BMedChemExpress CGP-57148B number of limitations that should be considered when interpreting the results of this review of literature. First, the results of the methodological quality assessment included in this systematic review are based on the assessor’s (RPH) interpretation of each of the studies. Often, the results reflect the quality of the PXD101 chemical information reporting of the research and, hence, should not be seen as a critique of the significance of the research and its outcomes. Second, given the relatively small number of studies published in this area and the wide variety of research questions addressed using wearable sensors, it is difficult to make strong recommendations regarding the most appropriate equipment, placements and outcomes for assessing standing balance and walking stability in people with PD. In light of these limitations, the results presented in this systematic review should be considered preliminary and additional work will be required as this field of science continues to evolve. In conclusion, wearable sensors provide a light-weight, portable and affordable alternative to more expensive three-dimensional motion analysis systems and are effective for detecting changes in standing balance and walking stability among people with PD. However, it appears that some outcome measures may be more useful than others for discriminating patient cohorts from controls. Specifically, measures of jerk and RMS acceleration for the trunk appear to be the best sensor-based measures of standing balance, even under less challenging conditions (i.e. feet apart on a firm surface with eyes open). For assessments of walking stability, a trunk-mounted wearable sensor can be used to assess the rhythmicity of dynamic gait patterns using the HR calculated for the three axes of motion. While some studies have provided support for other more complex frequency-based measures of postural stability, additional research is essential to objectively assess the utility of these measures for the PD population. Future research should give careful consideration to the internal and external validity of their methods and provide an appropriate sample size calculation to support their study, as these aspects could have been better reported in the existing literature.Supporting InformationS1 File. Systematic search strategy and procedures. (DOCX) S2 File. The quality of methodological reporting assessment tool and the outcomes of this assessment for each of the included studies. (DOCX)AcknowledgmentsThis project was supported by research funding provided by the Australian Catholic University (Project code #2013000584). Dr Michael H. Cole was also supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Researcher Fellowship (Project #GNT1016481)Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: RPH MHC. Performed the experiments: RPH MHC. Analyzed the data: RPH MHC. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: MHC GAN PAS. Wrote the paper: RPH MHC GAN PAS. Review and critical feedback on manuscript: MHC GAN PAS.PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0123705 April 20,19 /Wearable Sensors for Assessing Balance and Gait in Parkinson’s Disease
Molecular mimicry between Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides (LOSs) and human gangliosides GM1 and GD1a induces the production of anti-GM1 and anti-GD1a IgG antibodies, and the development of axonal Guillain-Barr?syndrome (GBS) [1, 2]. GM1b is a component of human peripheral nerves, and anti-GM1.Pulation. There are a number of limitations that should be considered when interpreting the results of this review of literature. First, the results of the methodological quality assessment included in this systematic review are based on the assessor’s (RPH) interpretation of each of the studies. Often, the results reflect the quality of the reporting of the research and, hence, should not be seen as a critique of the significance of the research and its outcomes. Second, given the relatively small number of studies published in this area and the wide variety of research questions addressed using wearable sensors, it is difficult to make strong recommendations regarding the most appropriate equipment, placements and outcomes for assessing standing balance and walking stability in people with PD. In light of these limitations, the results presented in this systematic review should be considered preliminary and additional work will be required as this field of science continues to evolve. In conclusion, wearable sensors provide a light-weight, portable and affordable alternative to more expensive three-dimensional motion analysis systems and are effective for detecting changes in standing balance and walking stability among people with PD. However, it appears that some outcome measures may be more useful than others for discriminating patient cohorts from controls. Specifically, measures of jerk and RMS acceleration for the trunk appear to be the best sensor-based measures of standing balance, even under less challenging conditions (i.e. feet apart on a firm surface with eyes open). For assessments of walking stability, a trunk-mounted wearable sensor can be used to assess the rhythmicity of dynamic gait patterns using the HR calculated for the three axes of motion. While some studies have provided support for other more complex frequency-based measures of postural stability, additional research is essential to objectively assess the utility of these measures for the PD population. Future research should give careful consideration to the internal and external validity of their methods and provide an appropriate sample size calculation to support their study, as these aspects could have been better reported in the existing literature.Supporting InformationS1 File. Systematic search strategy and procedures. (DOCX) S2 File. The quality of methodological reporting assessment tool and the outcomes of this assessment for each of the included studies. (DOCX)AcknowledgmentsThis project was supported by research funding provided by the Australian Catholic University (Project code #2013000584). Dr Michael H. Cole was also supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Researcher Fellowship (Project #GNT1016481)Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: RPH MHC. Performed the experiments: RPH MHC. Analyzed the data: RPH MHC. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: MHC GAN PAS. Wrote the paper: RPH MHC GAN PAS. Review and critical feedback on manuscript: MHC GAN PAS.PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0123705 April 20,19 /Wearable Sensors for Assessing Balance and Gait in Parkinson’s Disease
Molecular mimicry between Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides (LOSs) and human gangliosides GM1 and GD1a induces the production of anti-GM1 and anti-GD1a IgG antibodies, and the development of axonal Guillain-Barr?syndrome (GBS) [1, 2]. GM1b is a component of human peripheral nerves, and anti-GM1.

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