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). The rupture and repair of cooperation in borderline personality disorder. Science

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). The rupture and repair of cooperation in borderline personality disorder. Science, 321, 806?0. Knutson, B., Bossaerts, P. (2007). Neural antecedents of financial decisions. Journal of Neuroscience, 27, 8174?. Kong, J., White, N.S., Kwong, K.K., et al. (2006). Using fmri to dissociate sensory encoding from cognitive evaluation of heat pain intensity. Human Brain Mapping, 27, 715?1. Kuhnen, C.M., Knutson, B. (2005). The neural basis of financial risk taking. Neuron, 47, 763?0. ???Maihofner, C., Kaltenhauser, M., Neundorfer, B., Lang, E. (2002). Temporo-Spatial analysis of cortical activation by phasic innocuous and noxious cold stimuli magnetoencephalographic study. Pain, 100, 281?0.negative anticipatory affective states that can lead to increased risk aversion (Kuhnen and Knutson, 2005; Paulus et al., 2003). Differential insula activity may correspond to the effect of temperature on the shift of risk preference, where coldness (warmth) may prime individuals to be less risk-seeking (risk-aversive) during ensuing decision process. Exploring this possibility presents a potential avenue for future research on the neural correlates of temperature priming. In sum, the present research demonstrates the behavioral and neuropsychological relation between experiences of Necrostatin-1 web physical temperature and Quizartinib biological activity decisions to trust another person. Neuroimaging techniques revealed a specific activation pattern in insula that supported both temperature perception as well as the subsequent trust decisions. These findings supplement recent investigations on the embodied nature of cognition, by further demonstrating that early formed concepts concerning physical experience (e.g. cold temperature) underpin the more abstract, analogous social and psychological concepts (e.g. cold personality) that develop later in experience (Mandler, 1992), and that these assumed associations are indeed instantiated at the neural level. Perhaps most importantly, by exploring the functional mechanism by which temperature priming occurs, this work offers new insights into the ease by which incidental features of the physical environment can influence human decisionmaking, person perception and interpersonal behavior.Conflict of Interest None declared.
doi:10.1093/scan/nssSCAN (2012) 7 743^751 ,Differential neural circuitry and self-interest in real vs hypothetical moral decisionsOriel Feldman Hall,1,2 Tim Dalgleish,1 Russell Thompson,1 Davy Evans,1,2 Susanne Schweizer,1,2 and Dean MobbsMedical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK and 2Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1TP, UKClassic social psychology studies demonstrate that people can behave in ways that contradict their intentionsespecially within the moral domain. We measured brain activity while subjects decided between financial self-benefit (earning money) and preventing physical harm (applying an electric shock) to a confederate under both real and hypothetical conditions. We found a shared neural network associated with empathic concern for both types of decisions. However, hypothetical and real moral decisions also recruited distinct neural circuitry: hypothetical moral decisions mapped closely onto the imagination network, while real moral decisions elicited activity in the bilateral amygdala and anterior cingulateareas essential for social and affective processes. Moreover, during real moral decision-making, distinct regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) determined whet.). The rupture and repair of cooperation in borderline personality disorder. Science, 321, 806?0. Knutson, B., Bossaerts, P. (2007). Neural antecedents of financial decisions. Journal of Neuroscience, 27, 8174?. Kong, J., White, N.S., Kwong, K.K., et al. (2006). Using fmri to dissociate sensory encoding from cognitive evaluation of heat pain intensity. Human Brain Mapping, 27, 715?1. Kuhnen, C.M., Knutson, B. (2005). The neural basis of financial risk taking. Neuron, 47, 763?0. ???Maihofner, C., Kaltenhauser, M., Neundorfer, B., Lang, E. (2002). Temporo-Spatial analysis of cortical activation by phasic innocuous and noxious cold stimuli magnetoencephalographic study. Pain, 100, 281?0.negative anticipatory affective states that can lead to increased risk aversion (Kuhnen and Knutson, 2005; Paulus et al., 2003). Differential insula activity may correspond to the effect of temperature on the shift of risk preference, where coldness (warmth) may prime individuals to be less risk-seeking (risk-aversive) during ensuing decision process. Exploring this possibility presents a potential avenue for future research on the neural correlates of temperature priming. In sum, the present research demonstrates the behavioral and neuropsychological relation between experiences of physical temperature and decisions to trust another person. Neuroimaging techniques revealed a specific activation pattern in insula that supported both temperature perception as well as the subsequent trust decisions. These findings supplement recent investigations on the embodied nature of cognition, by further demonstrating that early formed concepts concerning physical experience (e.g. cold temperature) underpin the more abstract, analogous social and psychological concepts (e.g. cold personality) that develop later in experience (Mandler, 1992), and that these assumed associations are indeed instantiated at the neural level. Perhaps most importantly, by exploring the functional mechanism by which temperature priming occurs, this work offers new insights into the ease by which incidental features of the physical environment can influence human decisionmaking, person perception and interpersonal behavior.Conflict of Interest None declared.
doi:10.1093/scan/nssSCAN (2012) 7 743^751 ,Differential neural circuitry and self-interest in real vs hypothetical moral decisionsOriel Feldman Hall,1,2 Tim Dalgleish,1 Russell Thompson,1 Davy Evans,1,2 Susanne Schweizer,1,2 and Dean MobbsMedical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK and 2Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1TP, UKClassic social psychology studies demonstrate that people can behave in ways that contradict their intentionsespecially within the moral domain. We measured brain activity while subjects decided between financial self-benefit (earning money) and preventing physical harm (applying an electric shock) to a confederate under both real and hypothetical conditions. We found a shared neural network associated with empathic concern for both types of decisions. However, hypothetical and real moral decisions also recruited distinct neural circuitry: hypothetical moral decisions mapped closely onto the imagination network, while real moral decisions elicited activity in the bilateral amygdala and anterior cingulateareas essential for social and affective processes. Moreover, during real moral decision-making, distinct regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) determined whet.

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