panelarrow

When the trust decision was preceded by touching a cold pack

| 0 comments

When the trust decision was preceded by touching a cold pack, and not a warm pack. In addition, greater activation within bilateral insula was identified during the decision phase followed by a cold manipulation, contrasted to warm. These results suggest that the insula may be a key shared neural substrate that mediates the influence of temperature on trust processes. Keywords: temperature; insula; trust; economic decision; primingINTRODUCTION Trust plays an essential role in person perception and interpersonal decision making. Moreover, human social inferences and behaviors can be affected by physical temperature (Chaetocin site Williams and Bargh, 2008; Zhong and Leonardelli, 2008; IJzerman and Semin, 2009). For example, brief incidental contact with an iced (vs hot) cup of coffee leads people to subsequently perceive less interpersonal warmth in a hypothetical other and to behave less altruistically towards the known others in their life (Williams and Bargh, 2008). Moreover, feeling socially excluded leads people to judge their physical surroundings to be colder and express a preference for warmer products (Zhong and Leonardelli, 2008). Consistent with theories of embodied cognition, these investigations demonstrate that basic concepts derived from human interaction with the physical environment possess associative connections with higher order psychological concepts, such that activation of the former spreads to cause the activation of the latter (Barsalou, 1999; Niedenthal et al., 2005; Williams et al., 2009). Judgments of interpersonal, metaphorical warmth occur spontaneously and automatically upon encountering others (Fiske et al., 2007). People are able to reliably assess the trustworthiness of faces presented for only 100 ms, producing the same ratings as do other participants who are allowed to lookReceived 10 March 2010; Accepted 27 July 2010 Advance Access publication 27 August 2010 This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (grant CAREER DRL 0644131 to J.R.G.) and the National Institute of Mental Health (grant R01-MH60767 to J.A.B.). Correspondence should be addressed to John A. Bargh, Department of Psychology, 2 Hillhouse Aveneu, New Haven, CT 06511m USA. E-mail: [email protected] the faces for as long as they AC220 custom synthesis wished (Willis and Todorov, 2006). Indeed, spontaneous interpersonal warmth judgments can provide useful information regarding whom one should trust. Feelings of interpersonal warmth and coldness convey information regarding others’ intentions toward a social perceiver, such that greater coldness connotes less prosocial intentions (Fiske et al., 2007). To the extent that people sense metaphorical coldness (i.e. `foe, not friend’) in others, they should be and are less trusting of them. A theoretical motivation for linking temperature to trust is clear, but empirical evidence for the relationship between judgments of physical temperature and interpersonal trustworthiness remains limited. In the present research, we examined the behavioral consequences of temperature priming by investigating the effect of exposure to cold or warm objects on the extent to which people reveal trust in others during an economic trust game. We also sought constraints on the neural mechanisms by which experiences with physically cold or warm objects prime concepts and behavioral tendencies associated with psychological coldness or warmth. Specifically, we examined the neural correlates of temperature priming effects on decision proces.When the trust decision was preceded by touching a cold pack, and not a warm pack. In addition, greater activation within bilateral insula was identified during the decision phase followed by a cold manipulation, contrasted to warm. These results suggest that the insula may be a key shared neural substrate that mediates the influence of temperature on trust processes. Keywords: temperature; insula; trust; economic decision; primingINTRODUCTION Trust plays an essential role in person perception and interpersonal decision making. Moreover, human social inferences and behaviors can be affected by physical temperature (Williams and Bargh, 2008; Zhong and Leonardelli, 2008; IJzerman and Semin, 2009). For example, brief incidental contact with an iced (vs hot) cup of coffee leads people to subsequently perceive less interpersonal warmth in a hypothetical other and to behave less altruistically towards the known others in their life (Williams and Bargh, 2008). Moreover, feeling socially excluded leads people to judge their physical surroundings to be colder and express a preference for warmer products (Zhong and Leonardelli, 2008). Consistent with theories of embodied cognition, these investigations demonstrate that basic concepts derived from human interaction with the physical environment possess associative connections with higher order psychological concepts, such that activation of the former spreads to cause the activation of the latter (Barsalou, 1999; Niedenthal et al., 2005; Williams et al., 2009). Judgments of interpersonal, metaphorical warmth occur spontaneously and automatically upon encountering others (Fiske et al., 2007). People are able to reliably assess the trustworthiness of faces presented for only 100 ms, producing the same ratings as do other participants who are allowed to lookReceived 10 March 2010; Accepted 27 July 2010 Advance Access publication 27 August 2010 This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (grant CAREER DRL 0644131 to J.R.G.) and the National Institute of Mental Health (grant R01-MH60767 to J.A.B.). Correspondence should be addressed to John A. Bargh, Department of Psychology, 2 Hillhouse Aveneu, New Haven, CT 06511m USA. E-mail: [email protected] the faces for as long as they wished (Willis and Todorov, 2006). Indeed, spontaneous interpersonal warmth judgments can provide useful information regarding whom one should trust. Feelings of interpersonal warmth and coldness convey information regarding others’ intentions toward a social perceiver, such that greater coldness connotes less prosocial intentions (Fiske et al., 2007). To the extent that people sense metaphorical coldness (i.e. `foe, not friend’) in others, they should be and are less trusting of them. A theoretical motivation for linking temperature to trust is clear, but empirical evidence for the relationship between judgments of physical temperature and interpersonal trustworthiness remains limited. In the present research, we examined the behavioral consequences of temperature priming by investigating the effect of exposure to cold or warm objects on the extent to which people reveal trust in others during an economic trust game. We also sought constraints on the neural mechanisms by which experiences with physically cold or warm objects prime concepts and behavioral tendencies associated with psychological coldness or warmth. Specifically, we examined the neural correlates of temperature priming effects on decision proces.

Leave a Reply