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Themselves as members of a profession with the knowledge and responsibilities

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Themselves as members of a profession with the knowledge and responsibilities which attend membership. It is thus an inherently social process [11]. In health care education, previous research has expanded our understanding of professional socialization. In medicine, the process includes both the intended and unintended consequences of an educational program [12], the informal implicit aspects of a “hidden curriculum” that can be more powerful than the “manifest” or official curriculum [13], and the preprogram attitudes that are important agents of socialization [14]. In social work, the process can include only limited changes in students’ preprogram preferences [15] and the value and attitude dimensions have been identified as difficult to measure [16]. In physical therapy, the process is highly influenced by Necrostatin-1 supplier interactions with peers and faculty [17], by legitimation from socializing agents such as patients and clinical instructors [5], and by communication with practitioners [18]. In nursing education, previous research has examined professional socialization among select groups of student nurses, for example, traditional undergraduate nursing students [19, 20], undergraduate students specializing in community nursing [21], accelerated after degree students [22], male students [23], and students in distance programs [24]. Further, the experiences of select groups of Registered Nurses who upgrade their credentials have been explored. For example, upgrading to Nurse Anaesthetist [25]; to Nurse Practitioner [26, 27], and to Advanced Practice Nurse [28]. Finally, the legitimacy of nursing as an academic discipline has been examined [29]. Although an abundance of literature on professional socialization exists, there is a gap in our understanding of the experiences of vocationally educated nurses who attend university to earn their Registered Nurse (RN) credential. Kearney-Nunnery [30] explained that Licensed Practical Nurses are socialized to “collect client data and decide who needs to be informed,” while university educated Registered Nurses are socialized to “synthesize client data and make independent decisions” (page 19). Given the differences in role socialization between these two groups of nurses, when LPN to BN students undertake a mainly self-paced onlineNursing Research and Practice of professional socialization and the kinds of formal and informal socializing agents of legitimation that contributed to or distracted from their growing identity as Registered Nurses.3 university classes where you haven’t been sure about what it “feels like” to be a Registered Nurse? (b) Talk about experiences you have had so far in your practicums where you “felt like” a Registered Nurse and not a Licensed Practical Nurse? Have there been times in your practicums where you haven’t been sure about what it “feels like” to be a Registered Nurse? (3) Informal experiences (Employer Requirements, Workplace Interactions, and Existing Professional LPN Commitments). (a) What have employers and colleagues at your workplace said or done that contributed to your “feeling like” a Registered Nurse? What distracted? (b) How do your existing professional Licensed Practical Nurse commitments contribute to your process of becoming socialized into the role of Registered Nurse? How do they distract? (c) Talk about the sorts of 6-Methoxybaicalein site things that are going on in your life with family and friends that impact your changing role and professional identity. Transcripts from the.Themselves as members of a profession with the knowledge and responsibilities which attend membership. It is thus an inherently social process [11]. In health care education, previous research has expanded our understanding of professional socialization. In medicine, the process includes both the intended and unintended consequences of an educational program [12], the informal implicit aspects of a “hidden curriculum” that can be more powerful than the “manifest” or official curriculum [13], and the preprogram attitudes that are important agents of socialization [14]. In social work, the process can include only limited changes in students’ preprogram preferences [15] and the value and attitude dimensions have been identified as difficult to measure [16]. In physical therapy, the process is highly influenced by interactions with peers and faculty [17], by legitimation from socializing agents such as patients and clinical instructors [5], and by communication with practitioners [18]. In nursing education, previous research has examined professional socialization among select groups of student nurses, for example, traditional undergraduate nursing students [19, 20], undergraduate students specializing in community nursing [21], accelerated after degree students [22], male students [23], and students in distance programs [24]. Further, the experiences of select groups of Registered Nurses who upgrade their credentials have been explored. For example, upgrading to Nurse Anaesthetist [25]; to Nurse Practitioner [26, 27], and to Advanced Practice Nurse [28]. Finally, the legitimacy of nursing as an academic discipline has been examined [29]. Although an abundance of literature on professional socialization exists, there is a gap in our understanding of the experiences of vocationally educated nurses who attend university to earn their Registered Nurse (RN) credential. Kearney-Nunnery [30] explained that Licensed Practical Nurses are socialized to “collect client data and decide who needs to be informed,” while university educated Registered Nurses are socialized to “synthesize client data and make independent decisions” (page 19). Given the differences in role socialization between these two groups of nurses, when LPN to BN students undertake a mainly self-paced onlineNursing Research and Practice of professional socialization and the kinds of formal and informal socializing agents of legitimation that contributed to or distracted from their growing identity as Registered Nurses.3 university classes where you haven’t been sure about what it “feels like” to be a Registered Nurse? (b) Talk about experiences you have had so far in your practicums where you “felt like” a Registered Nurse and not a Licensed Practical Nurse? Have there been times in your practicums where you haven’t been sure about what it “feels like” to be a Registered Nurse? (3) Informal experiences (Employer Requirements, Workplace Interactions, and Existing Professional LPN Commitments). (a) What have employers and colleagues at your workplace said or done that contributed to your “feeling like” a Registered Nurse? What distracted? (b) How do your existing professional Licensed Practical Nurse commitments contribute to your process of becoming socialized into the role of Registered Nurse? How do they distract? (c) Talk about the sorts of things that are going on in your life with family and friends that impact your changing role and professional identity. Transcripts from the.

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