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These scandals involve a degree of patient neglect with patients being

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These scandals involve a degree of patient neglect with patients being left malnourished, dehydrated, in pain, or unwashed. The recent publication of the Francis Report in the UK in 2013 [10], provoked a national debate about nursing and its inherent Necrostatin-1MedChemExpress Necrostatin-1 professional values. Between January 2005 and March 2009, approximately 1200 patients were reported to have died as a direct result of the poor care they received at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. The public enquiry that followed highlighted failures to care delivery. These events were seen, in part, to be the consequence of poor leadership, a tolerance of poor standards, and a culture that prized meeting targets, many of which were financial, rather than delivering good quality care. Staff were fearful of repercussions for themselves, if situations that resulted in poor care were challenged. Given this current climate, there has rarely been a better time to ensure we are teaching values to nurses which promote justice, equality, and fairness. Debates which draw attention to practices and structures of oppression are essential and should be central to education and practice in nursing if we are to preserve core values which underpin caring relevant knowledge. It is imperative that nurses are taught concepts which are applicable to contemporary caring contexts and which can respond to changing global political contexts.Nursing Research and Practice of nursing literature around justice and that nurses’ concern with social justice has diminished until recently, as debates about providing individualised care became more significant in the literature [11]. Whilst there are numerous dimensions to social justice which concern policy makers, nurses, doctors, social workers, and politicians differently, justice in health care principally involves the problem of distributive justice (the sharing of materials, resources, and services) and the idea of procedural justice (maintaining fairness when making decisions). As health care systems, in the main, operate in conditions of scarcity, the allocation of resources in health care is of considerable public concern [12]. Nursing theories and models have been less radical than social work models, in challenging structures of oppression [11]. Traditional nursing models have focused on AG-221 site biological models, holistic care, individualised care, self-care, and patient centred care [13?6]. These models often consider the relationship between patient and nurse and developmental, environmental, social, cultural, and psychological contexts for care. More recent nursing models do incorporate social justice as a concept for analysis. Fawcett and Russell [17] stress the need for nurses to participate in the field of policy and offer a conceptual model for nursing practice which considers social justice as a core nursing value and part of an underpinning philosophy which aims to promote an interactive process that engages nurses in the development and implementation of health policy. Other nurse theorists discuss social justice as part of their conceptual models as a prerequisite to sustain compassionate and caring practices and a challenge to the social inequalities which cause suffering for individuals and communities [18?0]. These models, however, do not assist nurses to understand the distribution of power in communities, allocation of resources, the institutions, systems, processes, and polices which influence the nature of health care. Whilst some model.These scandals involve a degree of patient neglect with patients being left malnourished, dehydrated, in pain, or unwashed. The recent publication of the Francis Report in the UK in 2013 [10], provoked a national debate about nursing and its inherent professional values. Between January 2005 and March 2009, approximately 1200 patients were reported to have died as a direct result of the poor care they received at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. The public enquiry that followed highlighted failures to care delivery. These events were seen, in part, to be the consequence of poor leadership, a tolerance of poor standards, and a culture that prized meeting targets, many of which were financial, rather than delivering good quality care. Staff were fearful of repercussions for themselves, if situations that resulted in poor care were challenged. Given this current climate, there has rarely been a better time to ensure we are teaching values to nurses which promote justice, equality, and fairness. Debates which draw attention to practices and structures of oppression are essential and should be central to education and practice in nursing if we are to preserve core values which underpin caring relevant knowledge. It is imperative that nurses are taught concepts which are applicable to contemporary caring contexts and which can respond to changing global political contexts.Nursing Research and Practice of nursing literature around justice and that nurses’ concern with social justice has diminished until recently, as debates about providing individualised care became more significant in the literature [11]. Whilst there are numerous dimensions to social justice which concern policy makers, nurses, doctors, social workers, and politicians differently, justice in health care principally involves the problem of distributive justice (the sharing of materials, resources, and services) and the idea of procedural justice (maintaining fairness when making decisions). As health care systems, in the main, operate in conditions of scarcity, the allocation of resources in health care is of considerable public concern [12]. Nursing theories and models have been less radical than social work models, in challenging structures of oppression [11]. Traditional nursing models have focused on biological models, holistic care, individualised care, self-care, and patient centred care [13?6]. These models often consider the relationship between patient and nurse and developmental, environmental, social, cultural, and psychological contexts for care. More recent nursing models do incorporate social justice as a concept for analysis. Fawcett and Russell [17] stress the need for nurses to participate in the field of policy and offer a conceptual model for nursing practice which considers social justice as a core nursing value and part of an underpinning philosophy which aims to promote an interactive process that engages nurses in the development and implementation of health policy. Other nurse theorists discuss social justice as part of their conceptual models as a prerequisite to sustain compassionate and caring practices and a challenge to the social inequalities which cause suffering for individuals and communities [18?0]. These models, however, do not assist nurses to understand the distribution of power in communities, allocation of resources, the institutions, systems, processes, and polices which influence the nature of health care. Whilst some model.

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